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Legacy Pesticides Working Group update
The Legacy Pesticide Working Group is still working to find solutions to lead and arsenic contamination on former orchard lands. Find out the latest.
Yakima Railroad Area
Over the past 30 years, we've worked to clean up legacy pollution to soils and groundwater, and revitalize businesses along the Yakima Railroad Area Corridor.
Safer Choice: Because you shouldn’t need a PhD to know what’s safe
You shouldn’t need a PhD in toxicology to buy cleaning products. But long, confusing ingredient lists on common household products leave most consumers wondering what is safe to use in their homes.
Product Replacement Program helps businesses tackle toxics
Last year, Ecology’s Product Replacement Program helped more than 30 dry cleaners transition to safer cleaning methods. Now, we’re determining which toxic chemical we should help replace next.
Seven steps to slow the spread of COVID-19 at your home or business
Looking for ways to protect yourself, your family and your coworkers as you gradually start returning to normal? Here are some tips to stay safe while disinfecting your home or business.
Homeless encampment cleanup will help protect Washington residents from contamination
Gov. Inslee’s proposed budget provides funds for homeless encampment cleanup and support, which protects the environment and people, including those experiencing homelessness.
Cleaning up: How a light rail project keeps a landfill site on track
How do you build light rail and widen a freeway along the edge of a well-managed former municipal waste landfill? Very carefully!
Protecting human and environmental health with Safer Products for WA
Many of the products used every day contain toxic chemicals that escape into homes and the environment when they're used and disposed.
Crews safely remove, detonate dangerous chemical device

Homeowner finds poisonous theft deterrent in old safe. Ecology takes the chemicals and detonates them for safety. 

What do you do when the polluter is a mountain?
For decades, a slow-moving landslide has been exposing the side of Sumas Mountain. The landslide material contains naturally-occurring asbestos and heavy metals — and it all ends up in Swift Creek.

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