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Comment period extended for environmental review of Chehalis flood reduction project
The public is invited to participate in an online public hearing April 2 & online public meeting April 21 to comment on draft environmental review for proposed Chehalis River flood reduction project.
Helping communities reduce risks before floods, find solutions in the aftermath
In February, 2020, flooding brought the biggest disaster in decades to Southeast Washington. Learn how we're helping communities recover and improve their resiliency to future floods.
Zero Emission Vehicles: Driving towards the future

Washington state reached its 2020 goal of having 50,000 zero-emission electric vehicles on the road in September 2019.

Floating the Yakima River with a purpose

Warm water is becoming all too common in the summer months. So much so, that we have teams floating the river to document refuges of cooler water.

Don't let ground-level ozone ruin your summer fun

It’s the time of year you want to be outside but we’re not excited about ground-level ozone. 

New Ecology guidance helps protect cleanup sites from climate change impacts
Addressing climate change is a critical challenge for Washington state and a priority for Ecology. In response to our changing climate, we have created new guidance for cleaning up toxic sites.
Reynolds Smelter Cleanup/Millennium Bulk Terminals - Longview Update
There's a lot happening at the former Reynolds smelter site in Cowlitz County's industrial area this autumn.
A foot of water can make or break a King Tide

Help scientists track and document King Tides this year! The King Tides Photo Initiative is aimed at getting people to take and share photographs during unusually high tides.

King Tides: A glimpse into tomorrow, a photo challenge today
King Tides are the highest tides of the year. In Washington, these usually occur between late October and late January. 
Washington’s future is parched
Warmer conditions in Washington mean increased risk of drought, no surprise there. What might be surprising is how much our changing climate has already impacted water supplies in Washington.

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