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What a difference a year makes
“All in all, water conditions are looking pretty good around the state,” said Jeff Marti, Ecology’s water resources planner
Counting every drop in the Yakima Basin
A main goal of the water conservation element of the Yakima Integrated Plan is to modernize agricultural water systems to reduce waste from leaks, seepage, and inefficient delivery methods.
More than 100 years of water management builds sustainable supplies for Washington’s future
The state’s lengthy and colorful history of water law and water use regulations began long before the Department of Ecology was created in 1970.
New law improves capabilities for drought response and preparedness
The new drought law outlines a framework to build long-term drought resiliency, while improving the state’s ability to quickly and effectively respond to drought emergencies.
Uncertain times won't stop progress in the Walla Walla basin
Interest groups are coming together - via videoconference - to plan a long-term water strategy for the Walla Walla River Basin.
Help reduce food waste by giving us your best ideas
We are working on a plan to reduce food waste in Washington by 50%, and we would like your help. The public has until May 29 to provide ideas on how to prevent food waste.
Helping communities reduce risks before floods, find solutions in the aftermath
In February, 2020, flooding brought the biggest disaster in decades to Southeast Washington. Learn how we're helping communities recover and improve their resiliency to future floods.
Tackling nitrate contamination
Among our top priorities in Governor Jay Inslee’s 2020 supplemental budget is a request for $378,000 to expand monitoring for nitrates in Lower Yakima Valley private drinking water wells.
New Year, New Water Right Applications
With the start of the new year, the Water Resources Program released updates to our water right application forms. The forms hadn’t been revised in a number of years, and were due for some changes.
Let it snow!

More than half of the state's water supply starts out as snowpack, which is why it's important to keep an eye on it—not just for ski conditions, but as part of drought monitoring.

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